I Love Italian Articles

<p>
Italian offers a nice little assortment of articles: <em>un</em>, <em>un'</em>, <em>una</em>, <em>uno</em>, <em>il</em>, <em>la</em>, <em>lo</em>, <em>l'</em>, <em>i</em>, <em>gli</em>, and <em>le</em>. I am counting 11 different ways to render "a" and "the."</p>
<p>
<img alt="I'm Reading This..." src="/assets/images/uploads/Modern_Italian_Grammar_A_Practical_Guide_Routledge.jpeg" style="width: 720px; height: 538px;" /></p>
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I'm Reading This...</p>
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<img alt="...and Doing Exercises in This" src="/assets/images/uploads/Modern_Italian_Grammar_Workbook_Anna_Proudfoot.jpeg" style="width: 720px; height: 538px;" /></p>
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...and Doing Exercises in This</p>
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It was not a simple matter to learn how to pick among them, but once I got past the early frustrations, I really came to love these articles. I am right now doing article-related exercises in Anna Proudfoot's <em>Modern Italian Grammar Workbook</em>&nbsp;from Routledge and am getting such a kick out of it.</p>
<p>
For example, can you provide the correct definite article for each of the following nouns?</p>
<ul>
<li>
<em>occhiali&nbsp;</em>(eyes)</li>
<li>
<em>autobus </em>(buses)</li>
<li>
<em>artiste&nbsp;</em>(artists)</li>
</ul>
<p>
I have no idea why Italian articles are so appealing to me. Sorting through them in phrases and sentences feels kind of like a game. I don't even really like games, but this is a good kind of game for my particular neurological wiring, I suppose.</p>
<p>
I also just continue to take delight in words such as&nbsp;<em>gli</em> and <em>i</em>&nbsp;(both meaning "the"). They are very cute funny-looking little things.</p>
<p>
Answers for the above: <em>gli</em>, <em>gli</em>, <em>le</em>. Thank you for a fun way to spend a Saturday afternoon, Anna Proudfoot!</p>

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