Speed of Reading (Definitely Not Speed Reading)

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I continue to enjoy reading Yiddish words and sentences in my <em>Basic Yiddish </em>grammar, which I have now nearly completed, but I also continue to marvel at how much like a grade-school kid I feel when I am doing it.&nbsp;</p>
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In other words: I am soooooooo sloooow. Except actually, I wasn't really a slow reader in grade school. So I guess I am more like a pre-schooler.</p>
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<img alt="This Takes Me Forever" src="/assets/images/uploads/Basic_Yiddish_An_Exercise.jpg" style="width: 720px; height: 538px; " /></p>
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This Takes Me Forever</p>
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I am still reading <em>Outwitting History</em> by Aaron Lansky, the saver/saviour of Yiddish books for posterity and the founder of the <a href="http://www.yiddishbookcenter.org">Yiddish Book Center</a>. He has read a ton of Yiddish and studied it in graduate school at McGill in the late 1970s.</p>
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Something he wrote comforted me tremendously with respect to my sluggish pace. About his own Yiddish studies, he said, "...we were often assigned two full-length novels a week. I still read relatively slowly in Yiddish, with frequent recourse to a dictionary, and my first year of graduate school found me at my desk till two or three in the morning every night but Shabbos."</p>
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Phew. If Aaron Lansky is still slow(ish), then I feel better. It ain't easy to read unfamiliar letters backwards.</p>
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Oops, now that I have typed in and proofread the above quotation, I have just realized that his "read" was probably past tense, not present. I assumed it was present.</p>
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Rats. English is so annoying sometimes!&nbsp;The present tense, past tense, and past participle of "to read" are: "read," "read," and more "read." Can we not be a little more&nbsp;<em>innovative</em>, people?</p>
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<img alt="Central Park Turtles" src="/assets/images/uploads/Central_Park_Turtles_Enjoying_the_Sun.jpg" style="width: 360px; height: 270px; " /></p>
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Central Park Turtles</p>
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Okay, so I can no longer take comfort in Aaron Lansky's <em>current&nbsp;</em>reading speed. But at least I know for sure he was slow in graduate school!&nbsp;</p>
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By the way, did you see the exercise pictured above, from <em>Basic Yiddish</em>? Reading the questions, then writing my answers, then reading the answers in the back of the book (in print) and comparing them with my answers (in cursive)--all incredibly time-consuming.</p>
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But if I know that other people in this world are slow, too, then I mind much less.</p>
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Turtle power.</p>

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