Swahili and Norwegian!

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I am now 10 lessons into Pimsleur Swahili, and I am flipping back and forth between that and Pimsleur Norwegian, of which I have so far done four lessons.</p>
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There are 30 Pimsleur lessons available for each. A language appetizer.</p>
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Impressions: Swahili has a lot of syllables. It's fun. Like nothing else I have studied before, and the woman speaking in the audio lessons has a very appealing voice that draws me in.</p>
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<img alt="Pimsleur Walk with Swahili, Just After Sunset" src="/assets/images/uploads/Pimsleur_Walk_Swahili.jpg" style="width: 1000px; height: 750px;" /></p>
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Pimsleur Walk with Swahili, Just After Sunset</p>
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Norwegian's main challenge for me right now is pronunciation. It feels more familiar than Swahili, because it is a Germanic language and I have experience with those.</p>
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But Swahili's sounds are easier, with clean clear vowels, and even though it is more surprising to me than Norwegian, it is also significantly influenced by Arabic and I am recognizing plenty of words from that. Numbers, for instance.</p>
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I love recognizing Arabic influences in other languages. That happened with Turkish too. When I notice it, I feel happy.</p>
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Here's how my health and fitness plan is going: I walk a whole bunch doing Pimsleur lessons and then I eat peanut butter and chocolate Häagen Dazs ice cream.</p>
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There is definitely room for improvement.</p>
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To a rather ridiculous degree, I am obsessed now not only with Pimsleur but also with my month-old <a href="https://www.instagram.com/ellenjovin/">Instagram account</a>, where I can be found most days posting language porn, i.e., pictures of the covers of language books. It is not a very good use of my time, but I find it terribly satisfying! Kind of like cataloguing the world.</p>

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