Teach Yourself Beginner’s Hindi Script

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Here's some good news about the Hindi writing system: no capital letters, and no separate cursive forms to learn!</p>
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<em>Teach Yourself Beginner’s Hindi Script</em> by Rupert Snell was one of my favorite products for Hindi. It&nbsp;begins with an interesting history of the Devanagari script used in Hindi, and the chapters have cute titles such as “Consonants" and “Vowels," which I get a kick out of. Explanations are followed by enjoyable exercises.</p>
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I very much liked that Snell cautions you to copy the handwritten examples and not the printed forms ("printed" meaning as would be printed in a book). This may sound like a trivial point, but it is not.</p>
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In language-learning books I used for Japanese, Arabic, and maybe other languages I can't think of right now, the difference between print and handwritten examples was not always properly considered or explained, which led to confusion (mine) in writing exercises.</p>
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Addendum: This edition is now out of print, but the book has been reissued under the name&nbsp;<a href="http://www.mhprofessional.com/product.php?isbn=0071759921"><em>Read and Write Hindi Script: A Teach Yourself Guide</em></a>. I haven't tried it out, but I can see online that the table of contents is virtually identical.</p>

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